Teen, living with factor XIII A-subunit deficiency, seated with his clarinet in an auditorium


Manny has congenital FXIII deficiency


 



 

Tretten® is the only recombinant therapy for congenital FXIII A-subunit deficiency, a bleeding disorder affecting ≈1 in every 1 to 3 million people1,2


Efficacy and safety of Tretten®



Helping your patients with congenital FXIII A-subunit deficiency


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References
: 1. Kohler HP, Ichinose A, Seitz R, Ariens RAS, Muszbek L; Factor XIII and Fibrinogen SSC Subcommittee of the ISTH. Diagnosis and classification of factor XIII deficiencies. J Thromb Haemost. 2011;9(7):1404-1406. 2. Tretten [package insert]. Plainsboro, NJ: Novo Nordisk Inc; 2014.

Selected Important Safety Information

Tretten® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to the active substance or to any of the excipients.

Tretten® may cause allergic reactions. If signs or symptoms of anaphylaxis or hypersensitivity reactions (including urticaria, rash, tightness of the chest, wheezing, hypotension) occur, discontinue immediately and institute appropriate treatment.

Indications and Usage

Tretten® (Coagulation Factor XIII A-Subunit [Recombinant]) is indicated for routine prophylaxis of bleeding in patients with congenital Factor XIII A-subunit deficiency.

Tretten® is not for use in patients with congenital Factor XIII B-subunit deficiency.

Important Safety Information

Tretten® is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to the active substance or to any of the exicipients.

Tretten® may cause allergic reactions. If signs or symptoms of anaphylaxis or hypersensitivity reactions (including urticaria, rash, tightness of the chest, wheezing, hypotension) occur, discontinue immediately and institute appropriate treatment.

Thromboembolic complications may occur. Monitor patients with conditions that predispose to thrombosis for signs and symptoms of thrombosis after administration of Tretten®.

Inhibitory antibodies may occur with Tretten®. Patients with inhibitory antibodies may manifest as an inadequate response to treatment. If expected plasma FXIII activity levels are not attained, or if breakthrough bleeding occurs while receiving prophylaxis, perform an assay that measures FXIII inhibitory antibody concentrations.

The most common adverse reactions reported in clinical trials (≥1%) were headache, pain in the extremities, pain at injection site, and increase in fibrin D dimer levels. 

Thrombosis may occur if Tretten® is administered concomitantly with Factor VIIa.

There are no adequate and well-controlled studies using Tretten® in pregnant women to determine whether there is a drug-associated risk. Animal reproduction studies have not been conducted with Tretten®.

Please click here for Tretten® Prescribing Information.